Obama – The multicultural hero

I think it’s great that Obama has landed the Democratic Presidential nomination (even though the Clintons haven’t pulled out yet!). While many paint a picture of America as a land in which minority communities are treated as second class citizens, Obama’s success clearly demonstrates the meritocratic nature of its society and of its people.

Who would have imagined that a guy with a name that sounds like Osama, who has family residing in Kenya and has himself lived in Indonesia would one day succeed in being nominated for President. This stuff is of dreams.

Even if he doesn’t win the election (which I think he will), the simple fact that this guy has broken through sends a sharp message, firstly – to Americans, and secondly, to the world, that America has an improved understanding and appreciation of cultural issues than we’ve given it credit for in the past.

The knock on effect for America’s disasterous foreign policy is huge.

Senator McCain also understands this. Last weekend, he invited three contenders for the VP’s job to meet with him. Among the three was a relatively new and young Indian Senator called Bobby Jindal. Simply by asking to meet him, McCain and the GOP have also acknowledged the need to embrace diversity and multi-culturalism.

In Britain, we (including me) tom tom the egalitarian nature of our society, but we are so so far back when it comes to politics that I don’t see us electing a Prime Minister from the ethnic minorities for another decade or more – despite having a fantastic crop of minority MPs who are hugely talented in the House of Commons. I’m not for positive discrimination but I can’t see one of these breaking through in the same way as Obama.

What’s the solution? Do we need one?

 

 

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~ by vikaspota on June 5, 2008.

One Response to “Obama – The multicultural hero”

  1. I don’t think copycat politics is the way to go. What we want though are more young leaders who clearly have their finger on he pulse of the nation and who are building the experience to command the political and government machinery.

    We must remember that Obama was a rank outsider just a few months ago. He had already identified the central issues though and organized his support team. Students in California organized ahead of his formal candidacy. My Space had 160K members already.

    I was marveling last night that the President is elected so publicly. Our system is a little more cumbersome where you need to “take” the party first. Obama is the Presidential nominee but not head of the Democratic Party. Amazing that?

    Your question should be: which of the young upcoming politicians have that kind of connection with the electorate?

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